life

To do list & year/decade resolution for humanity

It’s the part of the year, when we start preparing our resolutions and our plans to engage the new year …

But what we failed to do is to look at this very productive activity from a wider scope or a global point of view … We the human race have failed in creating a unified 1year, 5 year or 10 year plan to improve the human existence on this planet.

Yes, specific organizations have this sort of multi year plan, but it addresses specific subject and often specific populations. A global plan to the scope of the planet have never been formulated or announced.

So here you go, here’s my modest attempt at it, and hopefully the internet will be helpful in improving it….

Humanity To Do List

Humanity 10 years Resolution

1- Switch to electric cars
2- Switch to renewable energy
3- Minimize the use of paper and reduce wood consumption
4- Start a Global effort to clean the oceans and revitalize the fish populations / impose some bans.
5- Reduce meat consumption by teaching more vegetarian and vegan recipes.
6- Reduce garbage, by reducing packaging, imposing laws to minimal packaging.
7- Ban plastic bags.
8- Centralize all space efforts, and put a tax per on countries according to their GDP
9- Land on Mars & create a Moon base.
10- Unify all armies under the UN commandment. 
11- Ban religious teaching for kids under 16. -this will be controversial-
12- Provide old age retirement centers for old people in poor countries - condition they have 2 kids or less.
13- Impose 1 or 2 child policy on highly reproductive populations : we don't want the future of humanity like in Idiocracy
14- Advance recycling and processing laws and applications.
15- Make all stats available, with no hiding or political correctness.
16- Change prisons into labor camps > Paying back to society literally.
17- Democratize governments, and decision making... this system is outdated.
18- Global connectivity: Something better than Facebook : not time waster.
19- Fast epidemic detection & response.
20- Unified monetary system based on value, not i owe yous.
21- Right for independence > whoever want to be independent let them be!
22- Education system redesigned around future roles in society.

I'm open for your suggestions, i'll add any suggestion below ...







Explain luck

I have been trying the last few days to understand luck …
Luck, is something that do exist and could not be scientifically explained, some people are born lucky and others with bad luck, sometimes luck change but you can never explain luck.

Why some people are lucky?
Some people have luck behind them all the way, finding a good job, a good house, great deal on a car, finding money on the ground, winning the lottery … Luck follows them like a pet dog follow the master, while others have no luck or sometimes bad luck instead ….
My question is why?
I mean it’s not a matter of effort, because the unlucky guy looks for 10x more job offers before landing the crappy job, while the lucky guy gets an amazing job quickly …
It’s not a matter of goodness & personality, because many lucky people are arsholes while many unlucky ones are super nice.

I initially thought that each human have a package of attributes different from others but that have the same sum, like in video games, when you get experience bonuses to spend on your character, you can add strength, health, intelligence, dexterity … I though maybe at birth each human have a package of attributes that are different but have same sum, for example:
Intelligence + luck + health + creativity + communication skills + ….
And that when 1 of these factors is high, the others should be lowered …. But then i asked myself, what about people & kids that die in disasters … My theory don’t hold much.
Then i wondered if there’s a trigger that kicks on/off the luck, for example if this guy is lucky we could end up having a war in 10 years, so better give him bad luck … But again this theory don’t hold much, the same argument as before, how would poor tsunami victims have changed the future …

For me, i would like to believe that luck works loosely on the above theories, with other factors involved as well!

So we don’t live a 100 year

A couple of weeks ago, our neighbor, a nice 70 year old lady passed away, she was a very nice lady, may she rest in peace, it was the day her 90 something year old friend came to visit. I had a chitchat with the 90 yr old lady … She told me about how she survived all her friends and siblings …

Bottom line is that we have the impression we will live a 100 year, but most people don’t even live to 70, especially men ..

We are weak creatures on our own, and our time on this earth is brief, we will probably spend it trying to achieve something instead of managing our time to enjoy life, all our society rules and standards were conceived as if we would live hundreds of years!

If this simple fact is acknowledged, people would work less than 9 months a year, unemployment would be almost none existent and rich people would put more efforts in saving nature, fighting poverty and diseases, instead of stacking money.

The French are probably the population that have understood life the most, they do work, produce quality goods & services but they also enjoy life much more than other populations!
The Japanese seam to be just the opposite of French way of life, they overwork!

Getting married ? know this : half marriages end in divorce

I was really chocked to discover these data, i wouldn’t have imagined it, I know marriage requires a lot of sacrifices, compromises, love and communication, and as a married guy i had my share of fights with my wife, but i would never have guessed that the percentage of failed marriages was that high!

Why is this happening ? no idea …
Getting married for a Belgium citizen should probably be banned, 71% of marriages end up in divorce!

So if you are getting married, before starting to prepare for your wedding, check the chances you have have .

here’s the Data and stats i found:

Country

 

 

 % Divorce:marriage ratio

 Belgium 71
 Portugal 68
 Hungary 67
 Czech Republic 66
 Spain 61
 Luxembourg 60
 Estonia 58
 Cuba 56
 France 55
 Lithuania 53
 United States 53
 Latvia 52
 Russia 51
 Switzerland 51
 Germany 49
 Canada 48
 Gibraltar 48
 Liechtenstein 48
 Austria 47
 Bulgaria 47
 Costa Rica 47
 Slovakia 47
 Sweden 47
 United Kingdom 47
 Denmark 46
 Belarus 45
 Finland 45
 European Union 44
 Norway 44
 Australia 43
 Netherlands 43
 Kuwait 42
 Moldova 42
 New Zealand 42
 Ukraine 42
 Dominican Republic 41
 San Marino 41
 Slovenia 38
 Iceland 37
 Japan 36
 South Korea 35
 Trinidad and Tobago 35
 Qatar 33
 Mongolia 32
 Suriname 31
 Cyprus 28
 Israel 28
 Romania 28
 Singapore 28
 Kazakhstan 27
 Panama 27
 Poland 27
 Venezuela 27
 Bermuda 25
 Greece 25
 Italy 25
 Jordan 25
 Saint Lucia 25
 Thailand 25
 Croatia 23
 El Salvador 23
 China 22
 Grenada 22
 Serbia 22
 Brazil 21
 Saudi Arabia 21
 Ecuador 20
 Turkey 20
 Albania 19
 Georgia 19
 Nicaragua 18
 Armenia 17
 Egypt 17
 Lebanon 17
 Mauritius 17
 South Africa 17
 Kyrgyzstan 16
 Ireland 15
 Mexico 15
 Iran 14
 Montenegro 14
 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 14
 Tonga 14
 Azerbaijan 12
 Republic of Macedonia 11
 Seychelles 11
 Jamaica 9
 Syria 9
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 8
 Uzbekistan 8
 Tajikistan 6
 Bahamas 5
 Guatemala 5
 Libya 5
 Vietnam 4
 Chile 3
 Colombia
 India
 Sri Lanka
 Uruguay

More data

Population
Marriage and divorce
Table 1: Crude marriage rate, seleted years, 1960-2011
(per 1 000 inhabitants)
1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2009 2010 2011
EU-27 : 7,9 6,8 6,3 5,2 4,5 4,4 :
Belgium 7,1 7,6 6,7 6,5 4,4 4,0 3,9 4,1
Bulgaria 8,8 8,6 7,9 6,9 4,3 3,4 3,2 2,9
Czech Republic 7,7 9,2 7,6 8,8 5,4 4,6 4,4 4,3
Denmark 7,8 7,4 5,2 6,1 7,2 6,0 5,6 4,9
Germany 9,5 7,4 6,3 6,5 5,1 4,6 4,7 4,6
Estonia 10,0 9,1 8,8 7,5 4,0 4,0 3,8 4,1
Ireland 5,5 7,0 6,4 5,1 5,0 4,9 4,6 4,3
Greece 7,0 7,7 6,5 5,8 4,5 5,2 5,0 4,9
Spain 7,8 7,3 5,9 5,7 5,4 3,8 3,6 3,4
France (1) 7,0 7,8 6,2 5,1 5,0 3,9 3,9 3,7
Italy 7,7 7,3 5,7 5,6 5,0 3,8 3,6 3,4
Cyprus (2) : 8,6 7,7 9,7 13,4 7,9 7,3 7,3
Latvia 11,0 10,2 9,8 8,9 3,9 4,4 4,1 5,2
Lithuania 10,1 9,5 9,2 9,8 4,8 6,2 5,7 6,3
Luxembourg 7,1 6,4 5,9 6,1 4,9 3,5 3,5 3,3
Hungary 8,9 9,3 7,5 6,4 4,7 3,7 3,6 3,6
Malta 6,0 7,9 8,8 7,1 6,7 5,7 6,2 6,2
Netherlands 7,7 9,5 6,4 6,5 5,5 4,4 4,5 4,3
Austria 8,3 7,1 6,2 5,9 4,9 4,2 4,5 4,3
Poland 8,2 8,6 8,6 6,7 5,5 6,6 6,0 5,4
Portugal 7,8 9,4 7,4 7,2 6,2 3,8 3,8 3,4
Romania 10,7 7,2 8,2 8,3 6,1 6,3 5,4 4,9
Slovenia 8,8 8,3 6,5 4,3 3,6 3,2 3,2 3,2
Slovakia 7,9 7,9 7,9 7,6 4,8 4,9 4,7 4,7
Finland 7,4 8,8 6,1 5,0 5,1 5,6 5,6 5,3
Sweden 6,7 5,4 4,5 4,7 4,5 5,1 5,3 5,0
United Kingdom 7,5 8,5 7,4 6,6 5,2 4,3 4,5 :
Iceland 7,5 7,8 5,7 4,5 6,3 4,6 4,9 4,6
Liechtenstein 5,7 5,9 7,1 5,6 7,2 4,3 5,0 4,5
Norway 6,6 7,6 5,4 5,2 5,0 5,0 4,8 4,6
Switzerland 7,8 7,6 5,7 6,9 5,5 5,4 5,5 5,3
Montenegro : : : : : 6,1 6,0 :
Croatia 8,9 8,5 7,2 5,8 4,9 5,1 4,8 4,6
FYR of Macedonia 8,6 9,0 8,5 8,3 7,0 7,3 6,9 7,2
Turkey : : 8,2 : : 8,2 8,0 8,0
(1) Excluding French overseas departments for 1960 to 1990.
(2) Up to and including 2002, data refer to total marriages contracted in the country, including marriages between non-residents; from 2003 onwards, data refer to marriages in which at least one spouse was resident in the country
 

 

 

Population
Marriage and divorce
Table 2: Crude divorce rate, selected years, 1960-2011 (1)
(per 1 000 inhabitants)
1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2009 2010 2011
EU-27 (2) : 1,0 1,5 1,6 1,8 1,9 : :
Belgium 0,5 0,7 1,5 2,0 2,6 3,0 2,7 2,9
Bulgaria : 1,2 1,5 1,3 1,3 1,5 1,5 1,4
Czech Republic 1,4 2,2 2,6 3,1 2,9 2,8 2,9 2,7
Denmark 1,5 1,9 2,7 2,7 2,7 2,7 2,6 2,6
Germany 1,0 1,3 1,8 1,9 2,4 2,3 2,3 2,3
Estonia 2,1 3,2 4,1 3,7 3,1 2,4 2,2 2,3
Ireland 0,7 0,7 0,7 0,7
Greece 0,3 0,4 0,7 0,6 1,0 1,2 : :
Spain 0,6 0,9 2,1 2,2 2,2
France (3) 0,7 0,8 1,5 1,9 1,9 2,0 2,1 2,0
Italy (2) 0,3 0,2 0,5 0,7 0,9 0,9 :
Cyprus : 0,2 0,3 0,6 1,7 2,2 2,3 2,3
Latvia 2,4 4,6 5,0 4,0 2,6 2,3 2,2 4,0
Lithuania 0,9 2,2 3,2 3,4 3,1 2,8 3,0 3,4
Luxembourg 0,5 0,6 1,6 2,0 2,4 2,1 2,1 :
Hungary 1,7 2,2 2,6 2,4 2,3 2,4 2,4 2,3
Malta 0,1
Netherlands 0,5 0,8 1,8 1,9 2,2 1,9 2,0 2,0
Austria 1,1 1,4 1,8 2,1 2,4 2,2 2,1 2,1
Poland 0,5 1,1 1,1 1,1 1,1 1,7 1,6 1,7
Portugal 0,1 0,1 0,6 0,9 1,9 2,5 2,6 2,5
Romania 2,0 0,4 1,5 1,4 1,4 1,5 1,5 1,7
Slovenia 1,0 1,1 1,2 0,9 1,1 1,1 1,2 1,1
Slovakia 0,6 0,8 1,3 1,7 1,7 2,3 2,2 2,1
Finland 0,8 1,3 2,0 2,6 2,7 2,5 2,5 2,5
Sweden 1,2 1,6 2,4 2,3 2,4 2,4 2,5 2,5
United Kingdom : 1,0 2,6 2,7 2,6 2,0 2,1 :
Iceland 0,7 1,2 1,9 1,9 1,9 1,7 1,8 1,6
Liechtenstein : : 3,9 2,7 2,4 2,5
Norway 0,7 0,9 1,6 2,4 2,2 2,1 2,1 2,1
Switzerland 0,9 1,0 1,7 2,0 1,5 2,5 2,8 2,2
Montenegro : : : : : 0,7 0,8 :
Croatia 1,2 1,2 1,2 1,1 1,0 1,1 1,1 1,3
FYR of Macedonia 0,7 0,3 0,5 0,4 0,7 0,6 0,8 0,9
Turkey : : : : : 1,6 1,6 1,6
(1) Divorce was not possible by law in Italy until 1970, in Spain until 1981, in Ireland until 1995 and in Malta until 2011.
(2) 1971 instead of 1970.
(3) Excluding French overseas departments for 1960 to 1990.
Source: Eurostat (online data code: demo_ndivind)

last table:

Population
Marriage and divorce
Table 3: Live births outside marriage, selected years, 1960-2011
(% share of total live births)
1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2009 2010 2011
EU-27 (1) : : : 17,4 27,4 37,3 38,3 :
Belgium 2,1 2,8 4,1 11,6 28,0 45,5 46,2 49,2
Bulgaria 8,0 8,5 10,9 12,4 38,4 53,4 54,1 56,1
Czech Republic 4,9 5,4 5,6 8,6 21,8 38,8 40,3 41,8
Denmark 7,8 11,0 33,2 46,4 44,6 46,8 47,3 49,0
Germany 7,6 7,2 11,9 15,3 23,4 32,7 33,3 33,9
Estonia : : : 27,2 54,5 59,2 59,1 59,7
Ireland 1,6 2,7 5,9 14,6 31,5 33,3 33,8 33,7
Greece 1,2 1,1 1,5 2,2 4,0 6,6 7,3 7,4
Spain 2,3 1,4 3,9 9,6 17,7 34,5 35,5 33,8
France (2) 6,1 6,8 11,4 30,1 43,6 53,7 55,0 :
Italy 2,4 2,2 4,3 6,5 9,7 19,8 21,5 26,3
Cyprus : 0,2 0,6 0,7 2,3 11,7 15,2 16,9
Latvia 11,9 11,4 12,5 16,9 40,3 43,5 44,1 44,6
Lithuania : 3,7 6,3 7,0 22,6 27,9 28,7 30,0
Luxembourg 3,2 4,0 6,0 12,8 21,9 32,1 34,0 34,1
Hungary 5,5 5,4 7,1 13,1 29,0 40,8 40,8 42,3
Malta 0,7 1,5 1,1 1,8 10,6 27,4 25,2 22,7
Netherlands 1,4 2,1 4,1 11,4 24,9 43,3 44,3 45,3
Austria 13,0 12,8 17,8 23,6 31,3 39,3 40,1 40,4
Poland : 5,0 4,8 6,2 12,1 20,2 20,6 21,2
Portugal 9,5 7,3 9,2 14,7 22,2 38,1 41,3 42,8
Romania : : : : 25,5 28,0 27,7 30,0
Slovenia 9,1 8,5 13,1 24,5 37,1 53,6 55,7 56,8
Slovakia 4,7 6,2 5,7 7,6 18,3 31,6 33,0 34,0
Finland 4,0 5,8 13,1 25,2 39,2 40,9 41,1 40,9
Sweden 11,3 18,6 39,7 47,0 55,3 54,4 54,2 54,3
United Kingdom 5,2 8,0 11,5 27,9 39,5 46,3 46,9 47,3
Iceland 25,3 29,9 39,7 55,2 65,2 64,4 64,3 65,0
Liechtenstein 3,7 4,5 5,3 6,9 15,7 18,5 21,3 23,5
Norway 3,7 6,9 14,5 38,6 49,6 55,1 54,8 55,0
Switzerland 3,8 3,8 4,7 6,1 10,7 17,9 18,6 19,3
Montenegro : : : : : 15,7 : :
Croatia 7,4 5,4 5,1 7,0 9,0 12,9 13,3 14,0
FYR of Macedonia 5,1 6,2 6,1 7,1 9,8 12,2 12,2 11,6
Turkey : : : : : : 2,6 :
(1) Excluding French overseas departments and Romania for 1990.
(2) Excluding French overseas departments for 1960 to 1990.
Source: Eurostat (online data code: demo_find)

0

Hire men or women?

Few days ago was the international women day, so i wanted to write a blog post about an issue.

There’s no doubt, that humanity have had a big social leap forward since the stone ages, women were weak and 100% dependant on men, now they are not. Probably women had the biggest role in the early creation of societies, i can hardly imagine the early hunters gatherers men socialising.

I started with the above intro just to explain that women have a vital role in society, later, when humanity succeeded in organising communities, cities and countries, the role of men evolved but not much the role of women, so the fast catching up the last 100 year or so, is seen sometimes as an unormality by some men.

So back to the question, hire a male employee or a female employee?
No doubt each has advantages & disadvantages, in general ( eventhough there’s a lot of exception to this general rule)
Women have more patience to deal with customers, even to fidelise clients, so when it gets to standard customer relation employee, it’s best to have a female employee.
Men are more technical, in certain domains it is even better to have a male customer relation employee.
With some exception men are better at field work, technical work…

Basically men & women have different types of intelligence, and assessing your need will eventually get you an employee that better fills the business need.

Homeless and need money

I saw this question:

What would you do if you found yourself on the street, with no home and no job?

it’s a tough question, here’s some ideas:

– Collect wild flowers and sell them for women (for cheap).

– Carve some objects in wood , and write a sign, help me sleep in a room, buy my art.

–  Buy these long balloons and try to do animal shapes ( you won’t succeed easily so at first, buy a whiteboard pen and draw on the balloons (eyes, mouth, etc…). > kids love balloons

–  Get some white pebbles and color each in a different color, buy nice candles and some glass jar or vases, you have a Product (donno success rate though)

– Find the nearest advertising agency and offer them to distribute flyers for cheap.

– Take care of stray dogs/cats (feed them etc…) and ask people to donate for your cause.

– Offer shop owners to clean the floor for cheap.

I hope this helps